Friday, 19 July 2013

SharePoint 2013: Get UserProfile Properties with REST API

In my last post SharePoint 2013: Working with User Profiles & JavaScript CSOM we saw how to get SharePoint UserProfile Properties using the JavaScript Client Object Model. In this post lets have a look at how to get them using the REST API. Here is a quick reference for the REST API endpoints.

(List of All User Properties and UserProfile Properties at the end of the post)


1) Get all properties of current user:

http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties



2) Get single property of current user:

http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties/PictureUrl
OR
http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties?$select=PictureUrl



3) Get Multiple Properties for the current user:

http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetMyProperties?$select=PictureUrl,AccountName



4) Get all properties of Specific User:


For Office 365/SharePoint Online:
http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetPropertiesFor(accountName=@v)?@v='i:0%23.f|membership|vardhaman@siteurl.onmicrosoft.com'

For SharePoint 2013 On-Premise:
http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetPropertiesFor(accountName=@v)?@v='domain\username'



5) Get Specific UserProfile Property of Specific User:


For Office 365/SharePoint Online:
http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetUserProfilePropertyFor(accountName=@v,propertyName='LastName')?@v='i:0%23.f|membership|vardhaman@siteurl.onmicrosoft.com'


For SharePoint 2013 On-Premise:
http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetUserProfilePropertyFor(accountName=@v,propertyName='LastName')?@v='domain\username'



6) Get Multiple UserProfile Properties for Specific User:


Update (01/06/2016): Since the time I wrote this post, REST API batching has been implemented in SharePoint Online. As a result, we can make multiple REST requests to the GetUserProfilePropertiesFor function in a single REST call. This way, we can get Multiple custom/OOB UserProfile Properties for a Specific User without making multiple calls.

Here is my post on it:
SharePoint Online: Get UserProfile Properties with REST API Batching

Original Post Continues:

http://siteurl/_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetUserProfilePropertiesFor
_api/SP.UserProfiles.PeopleManager/GetUserProfilePropertiesFor

As far as my research is concerned, this method is NOT supported in the REST API. The call to this method returns the following error:

"The method GetUserProfilePropertiesFor cannot be invoked as its parameter propertiesForUser is not supported."

If anybody finds any additional information on this, then I would love to update my blog on it. Here is my code for executing the above method:



-------

List of User Properties (Use the GetPropertiesFor function for these):

AccountName
DirectReports
DisplayName
Email
ExtendedManagers
ExtendedReports
IsFollowed
LatestPost
Peers
PersonalUrl
PictureUrl"
Title
UserProfileProperties
UserUrl

List of User Profile Properties (Use the GetUserProfilePropertyFor function for these):

AboutMe
SPS-LastKeywordAdded
AccountName
SPS-Locale
ADGuid
SPS-Location
Assistant
SPS-MasterAccountName
CellPhone
SPS-MemberOf
Department
SPS-MUILanguages
EduExternalSyncState
SPS-MySiteUpgrade
EduOAuthTokenProviders
SPS-O15FirstRunExperience
EduPersonalSiteState
SPS-ObjectExists
EduUserRole
SPS-OWAUrl
Fax
SPS-PastProjects
FirstName
SPS-Peers
HomePhone
SPS-PersonalSiteCapabilities
LastName
SPS-PersonalSiteInstantiationState
Manager
SPS-PhoneticDisplayName
Office
SPS-PhoneticFirstName
PersonalSpace
SPS-PhoneticLastName
PictureURL
SPS-PrivacyActivity
PreferredName
SPS-PrivacyPeople
PublicSiteRedirect
SPS-ProxyAddresses
QuickLinks
SPS-RegionalSettings-FollowWeb
SID
SPS-RegionalSettings-Initialized
SISUserId
SPS-ResourceAccountName
SPS-AdjustHijriDays
SPS-ResourceSID
SPS-AltCalendarType
SPS-Responsibility
SPS-Birthday
SPS-SavedAccountName
SPS-CalendarType
SPS-SavedSID
SPS-ClaimID
SPS-School
SPS-ClaimProviderID
SPS-ShowWeeks
SPS-ClaimProviderType
SPS-SipAddress
SPS-ContentLanguages
SPS-Skills
SPS-DataSource
SPS-SourceObjectDN
SPS-Department
SPS-StatusNotes
SPS-DisplayOrder
SPS-Time24
SPS-DistinguishedName
SPS-TimeZone
SPS-DontSuggestList
SPS-UserPrincipalName
SPS-Dotted-line
SPS-WorkDayEndHour
SPS-EmailOptin
SPS-WorkDayStartHour
SPS-FeedIdentifier
SPS-WorkDays
SPS-FirstDayOfWeek
Title
SPS-FirstWeekOfYear
UserName
SPS-HashTags
UserProfile_GUID
SPS-HireDate
WebSite
SPS-Interests
WorkEmail
SPS-JobTitle
WorkPhone
SPS-LastColleagueAdded

Tuesday, 16 July 2013

Include Caching in jQuery getScript

While going through some MSDN documentation on SharePoint 2013, I noticed that Microsoft has suggested to use the jQuery.getScript method to load the SP.Runtime.js and the SP.js files on the page.
For Example:



I did not think about this twice but when I actually brought this into practice, I noticed that the function was fetching the files every time the page would load. After a bit of digging in the jQuery documentation, I found out that this is because the jQuery.getScript function disables caching. It gets the fresh copy of requested files every time by appending a current time time stamp at the end of the file path. You can see the firebug screen-cap of the call here:


This is not good for us because I don't want to spend extra time getting a fresh copy of the file on every page load. We know that once the file is fetched, the browser caches it and maintains a copy if any further requests for the same file are made in the future. jQuery.getScript by default does not allow us to take the advantage of this feature.

To overcome this limitation. I dug a little deeper into the jQuery docs and found that jQuery.getScript internally calls the good old jQuery.ajax function. This function has a "cache" parameter which we can use to set whether the ajax function looks into the browser cache for the requested file or it directly fetches it from the location. I created a handy function to wrap around the jQuery.ajax call to support caching. Here is the code:



After I run this code, I get the following output in firebug. As you can see, there is no time-stamp at the end of the second request and also the time taken to fetch the file is significantly less (about 90% less) than the call to get the fresh copy.


So as you saw, we have built our own wrapper around the jQuery.ajax function which allows us to get cached files and significantly improve page load times. Hope you find this tip helpful!

Happy JavaScripting!

Monday, 15 July 2013

Batch Operations using the JavaScript Client Object Model

To improve performance and to reduce the time taken for data to travel over the wire, we can do batch operations using the Client Object Model in SharePoint. This can really help in reducing load time of pages and make the user experience better. Batch operations can be done using the .NET as well as the JavaScript Client Object Model. In this post, we are going to focus on how to perform batch operations using the JavaScript Client Object Model. In each of the following operations, only one call from the client to server will be made. It will contain all the information needed to perform the necessary operation. So without further ado, here is the code:

1) Batch Add Items to List:




2) Batch Update Items from List:



3) Batch Delete Items from List:

Now let us analyze what happens behind the scenes when we make one of these batch operations. Here is the firebug screen grab of the call to batch create 5 items:


Now as you can see, only one call is made from the client to the server. It contains all the XML necessary for creating the 5 items. Here is the relevant XML:


Hope you enjoyed this blog post. Happy SharePointing!

Addendum: I would also like to point out one of the hidden gems of the SharePoint world: if you are using Server Side Code (Full Trust), there is a similar batch method available called SPWeb.ProcessBatchData which can be used to bulk add, edit and delete list items. This is really helpful because it can operate on large number of items at once without making repeated calls to the database.

Tuesday, 2 July 2013

Convert a SharePoint WebApplication from Classic authentication to Claims

Here is a quick Powershell script to convert a SharePoint WebApplication from Classic (Windows) Authentication to Claims Authentication. This script is tested in SharePoint 2010 only.

When working with SharePoint 2013, you will not need this in most cases as the default authentication provider is Claims.